Man Booker Prize awarded to Tasmanian Author

The prestigious 2014 Man Booker Prize has been awarded to Richard Flanagan, for his novel The Narrow Road to the Deep North.

Richard Flanagan winner speech 1 - credit Janie Airey

The prestigious 2014 Man Booker Prize has been awarded to Richard Flanagan, for his novel The Narrow Road to the Deep North.  The Prize is awarded to the best fiction written in English and published in the United Kingdom.

The judges of the 2014 Prize are: Jonathan Bate, Sarah Churchwell, Dr Alastair Niven, Dr Daniel Glaser and Erica Wagner. The winner was Richard Flanagan with The Narrow Road to the Deep North, which is Flanagan’s sixth novel.

The story explores the experiences of surgeon Dorrigo Evans in a Japanese POW camp on the now infamous Thailand-Burma railway. The Financial Times calls it ‘elegantly wrought, measured and without an ounce of melodrama… nothing short of a masterpiece.’  The Judges described it as ‘a harrowing account of the cost of war to all who are caught up in it’.

Questioning the meaning of heroism, the book explores what motivates acts of extreme cruelty and shows that perpetrators may be as much victims as those they abuse. Flanagan’s father, who died the day he finished The Narrow Road to the Deep North, was a survivor of the Burma Death Railway.

In a Press Release, AC Grayling comments: ‘The two great themes from the origin of literature are love and war: this is a magnificent novel of love and war. Written in prose of extraordinary elegance and force, it bridges East and West, past and present, with a story of guilt and heroism.

‘This is the book that Richard Flanagan was born to write.’

As winner of the 2014 Man Booker Prize, Flanagan received £50,000, and a trophy.  He also receives a designer bound edition of his book, and £2,500 for being shortlisted.

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